Healed in Soul and Body

Text: Matthew 9:1-8

Lord, Thee I love with all my heart; I pray Thee, ne’er from me depart, with tender mercy cheer me. Earth has no pleasure I would share. Yea, heav’n itself were void and bare if Thou, Lord, wert not near me. And should my heart for sorrow break, my trust in Thee can nothing shake. Thou art the portion I have sought; Thy precious blood my soul has bought. Lord Jesus Christ, my God and Lord…forsake me not! I trust Thy Word.[1]

The words of our hymn were written around 1567 by the pastor Martin Schalling. Martin served many years as a pastor and was removed not once – but three times – from his office for refusing to compromise his Lutheran beliefs. Through it all, he trusted in the Lord’s mercy and grace. The same could also have been sung by the paralyzed man and his friends in the Gospel text.

When they heard that Jesus was in the area preaching, teaching, and healing, some men brought their paralyzed friend to also be healed by Jesus. Recognizing faith in their and the man’s hearts, Jesus declared to the man, “Your sins are forgiven.”[2] Then, as a demonstration of His great love, and His authority to forgive sins, Jesus healed the man. The man picked up his mat and went home, leaving the crowds to glorify God.

We see in this text Jesus’ great love and compassion, and His great desire to heal. The order Jesus did things in the text can also teach us something. First, He diagnosed and healed the man’s greater affliction: his sin. Then, Jesus also healed his body. He does the same for us. Jesus heals our souls of sin now through the Gospel, and in the resurrection, our bodies, too.

I.

Our text from Matthew 9 continues in a string of teaching and miracles from our Lord. Just before our text, Jesus crossed over to the east side of the Sea of Galilee. That was when He calmed the storm. While He was on the other side, He cast the demons out of two men. The demons went into a herd of pigs and drowned them. All the people of that city came out and begged Jesus to leave them. So, He did. He crossed back over to the west side, to His home base in the town of Capernaum. Jesus did many miracles there: healing Peter’s mother-in-law, raising a girl from the dead, and just generally healing many people. Thus, in our text there was a great crowd around Jesus. This was a standing-room only situation.

As Jesus was teaching, some brought to Him a man who was paralyzed. St. Mark and St. Luke tell us that, because the house was so crowded, and they couldn’t otherwise get to Jesus, they actually cut a hole in the roof of the house and lowered the man down. St. Matthew writes, “When Jesus saw their faith, He said to the paralytic, ‘Take heart, My son; your sins are forgiven.’”[3] What an odd thing to say. And yet, maybe not. The men approached Jesus in faith, seeking healing. Jesus the Great Physician diagnosed and healed the man’s greater illness: his sin. As great as the man’s physical affliction was, his paralysis had an expiration date. When he died, he wouldn’t be paralyzed anymore. In the Resurrection, the full use of his body would return. There’s one thing that could de-rail that though, sin and its fruit.

See, we’re more than just our bodies. As Christians, we recognize from Scripture that all we see is not all that exists. You might have this memorized, “Faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.”[4] We believe that when God formed each of us in the womb, He gave us not just our body, but our soul as well. Which of these two lasts longer? Well, our soul, of course. And, just like our bodies, our souls are prone to sickness, too. The illness of our soul is sin. When we die, the sickness in our body dies; not with our soul. Sin, which separates from God, unless it is forgiven, clings to our soul forever. And, those whose sins are not forgiven or those who reject that forgiveness, have their sins bound to their souls forever in hell. Therefore, Jesus first healed the man’s greater illness, his sin.

II.

St. Matthew at this point writes, “Some of the scribes said to themselves, ‘This man is blaspheming.’”[5] St. Mark tells us that, in this standing-room only situation, the scribes were sitting. This marks about the beginning of serious opposition to Jesus. Their charge was this: that Jesus was committing blasphemy by forgiving the man’s sins. Blasphemy is when you take the glory that belongs to God and ascribe it to anything else. Blasphemy in general is breaking one of the first three Commandments. So, they accused Jesus of blaspheming by forgiving sins, which only God can do. This line of thinking Jesus called evil.

St. Matthew continues, “Jesus, knowing their thoughts, said, ‘Why do you think evil in your hearts? For which is easier, to say, “Your sins are forgiven,” or to say, “Rise and walk”? But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins…Rise, pick up your bed and go home.’”[6] Jesus asked them why they were thinking evil. Then, He turned the tables and asked them question. Which is easier to do? To say he is forgiven, or to tell him to walk? Obviously, it’s saying your sins are forgiven. How can you really measure from the outside if someone’s sins are forgiven? When sins are forgiven there’s isn’t an external change in the person. But, if you say, “get up and walk,” and that doesn’t happen…that’s pretty quick proof of something. So, to demonstrate that He has the authority to forgive sins, Jesus told the man to get up, and he did. Jesus healed the man’s soul and his body.

Jesus did this because of His great love for the man and for us. We are all weighed-down and beset by sin. It clings to us, pressing in on us from every side. Were it not forgiven, it would drag us all down into the eternal pit of hell. So that that might not be the case, Jesus took on flesh to suffer and die for you. Through His Word and Sacraments, He offers healing, peace, and pardon to you. In Baptism, your sin was washed away, and you received the Holy Spirit. Through the preaching of the Word, the Holy Spirit strengthens you in the faith and daily declares to you that your sins are forgiven for the sake of Christ. In the Lord’s Supper, we partake of Christ’s very body and blood, which purifies and heals us from the inside. By these things, our souls are healed, and we receive passage into the eternal kingdom of heaven.

Every Sunday we confess our faith not just in the forgiveness of sins, but also in the life of the world to come. In the text Jesus healed the man’s soul and in the Word and Sacraments, He heals our souls. Jesus healed the man’s body and, in the Resurrection, will fully restore ours as well. Jesus’ great love doesn’t just cover our souls, but our bodies, too. Otherwise, God wouldn’t have given us bodies or continued to care for them throughout our earthly lives. Just as the man was healed in the text, we all will be healed in the Resurrection. When Christ returns, He will raise the bodies of you, me, and all believers. We will together be changed. Our bodies will no longer bear the effects of sin, but will be as God created them to be.

In our text, we see Jesus’ great love for all mankind demonstrated. When a paralyzed man was brought to Him seeking healing, Jesus recognized His greatest need – the forgiveness of sins. Jesus forgave the man, healing His soul. Then, Jesus also healed the man’s body. Through the Word and Sacraments, Jesus has healed and continues to heal our souls of sin. And, in the Resurrection, He will fully heal our bodies, too.


[1] “Lord, Thee I Love with All My Heart,” stanza 1.

[2] Mt. 9:2, English Standard Version.

[3] Mt. 9:2.

[4] Heb. 11:1.

[5] Mt. 9:3.

[6] Mt. 9:4-6.

This is My Body, This is My Blood

Text: The Sacrament of the Altar

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ, tonight we gather again in observance of our Lord’s passion. This past Sunday we celebrated with hymns of victory and praise. We left the sanctuary with palm branches in our hands, symbols of our King’s victory over sin, death, and hell. Tonight, Holy Thursday, marks the night when our Lord was betrayed into the hands of sinful men, an event foretold in Sacred Scripture and necessary for our salvation. Yet, on this night we also celebrate the most holy meal given us to eat. The holy Evangelists Matthew, Mark, Luke, and St. Paul write:

Our Lord Jesus Christ, on the night when He was betrayed, took bread, and when He had given thanks, He broke it and gave it to the disciples and said: “Take, eat; this is My body, which is given for you. This do in remembrance of Me.”

In the same way also He took the cup after supper, and when He had given thanks, He gave it to them, saying, “Drink of it, all of you; this cup is the new testament in My blood, which is shed for you for the forgiveness of sins. This do, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of Me.”

Tonight we momentarily continue our Lenten devotion as we meditate on the gift of our Lord’s precious body and blood in His Supper. In this meal we receive the true body and blood of Jesus under the bread and wine for the forgiveness of our sins. As our Savior went willingly to His death, He left us His last will and testament in this Sacrament, desiring that we receive it together until He returns at the end of time.

The Sacrament of the Altar, Holy Communion, the Eucharist, and the Lord’s Supper are all names for the same meal we confess and celebrate this evening. Already we’ve heard what the Church knows as the Words of Institution. These are the words that Christ spoke as He reclined with His disciples in the Upper Room. It was in the midst of the Passover meal, the meal that Jesus said He earnestly desired to eat before His suffering, that Christ gave us something new. At a certain time He took bread. After He had given thanks, He broke and gave it to the disciples saying, “This is my body which is for you.” In the same way He took cup and, when He had given thanks, gave it to them saying, “This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.” With these words Christ gives us the Sacrament of the Altar and explains to us what it is, what it gives, and who it is for.

First, what is the Sacrament of the Altar? It is as Jesus says in His own words: His body and His blood. As we learn it from the Small Catechism, “It is the true body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, under the bread and wine, for us Christians to eat and to drink, instituted by Christ Himself.” In Holy Communion the very body and blood which were broken and shed for the forgiveness of sins are given to us in the form of bread and wine. Though we see with our eyes only the bread and wine, yet through faith we know that, by the power of His Word, Christ Jesus joins Himself to the elements. As St. Paul writes, “The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation [communion] in the body of Christ?”

We therefore believe that these words of Christ are plain and clear: “This is My body…This is My blood.” The bread is not just bread, but the real body of Christ. The wine is not just wine, but the real blood of Christ. We are not cannibals. We simply believe in what theologians call the sacramental union, a technical term that basically means: “Jesus is God. He knows how to do things I don’t understand. He says the bread is His body and the wine, His blood. Therefore, it is.” We believe that the Words of Institution mean exactly what they say, such that even a child can read and understand them and confess that when Christ says “is,” He means it.

  1.  

In the Lord’s Supper we receive in, with, and under the elements of bread and wine the true body and blood of Jesus Christ. It is the same body and blood that was bruised, broken, and shed on the cross, and which rose from the dead to be seated at the right hand of God the Father. Christ gives this meal to us freely; but for what purpose? Jesus said so in the words we heard at the beginning of the sermon, “Given for you…shed for you for the forgiveness of sins.” If someone asked you to give them the Christian faith in a nutshell, what would you say? Probably the best answer is that it’s about the reconciliation between God and sinners through Jesus’ death for the forgiveness of sins. Christianity’s all about the forgiveness of sins. What do we receive in the Lord’s Supper? The forgiveness of sins.

We believe that we receive our Lord’s body and blood in His Supper for the express purpose of receiving forgiveness. This is not a special forgiveness, mind you. You are not receiving a different forgiveness than you received in Baptism or through the preaching of the Gospel or through Holy Absolution. You are, though, receiving it in an especially neat way, though. Christ, through His Word, gives into your mouth His very body and blood to bring to you the forgiveness He won for you on the cross. In the Supper He is intimately joined to you, and you to Him.

There are other benefits that we receive from the Lord’s Supper, though the most important benefit remains the forgiveness of sins. Along with it we receive eternal life and salvation. Where there is forgiveness of sins death no longer reigns, hence eternal life and salvation in Christ. We also receive in the Sacrament the strengthening of our faith in Christ, which leads us to also love God and our neighbor. Lastly, by communing together, there is also a public demonstration of our unity in faith. St. Paul writes, “Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.” Likewise, “As often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes.”

III.  

We believe from our Lord’s Words of Institution that what we receive in His Supper is not just bread and wine, but also His true body and blood, broken and shed for us. In the Holy Sacrament Christ gives us these gifts for the forgiveness of sins and the strengthening of faith. We’ve now heard what the Lord’s Supper is and what it’s for, but now we must ask who is it for? Let us hear the words we’ve learned from the Small Catechism. “Fasting and bodily preparation are, indeed, fine outward training. But a person is truly worthy and well prepared who has faith in these words, ‘Given … and shed for you for the forgiveness of sins.’” What does that mean? The Lord’s Supper was instituted for the sake of poor sinners like us. In the Sacrament Christ offers peace and pardon in the forgiveness of sins, and He invites to His table those who believe His Words; namely, that the Supper is His true body and blood, not symbolically but sacramentally, given for the forgiveness of sins.

Our individual beliefs do not make it the Lord’s Supper, but the power of Christ’s Word alone does. Neither do we receive the benefits of the Sacrament just by doing the motions, as if a ritual could merit us salvation. Rather, the power of the Sacrament lies in Christ’s Word and its benefits are received only by those who believe what Christ says about it and desire what Christ gives in it. Those who do not believe Christ’s Words or doubt them should not receive the Lord’s Supper. For, St. Paul writes, “Anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself.”

In the Lord’s Supper we receive a visible, tangible gift of God and the assurance that Christ is with us, always at work forgiving our sins. Jesus gave us many promises in His ministry, “I am with you always; I will never leave you nor forsake you; Where two or three are gathered in My Name, there am I; This is My Body, This is My blood for the forgiveness of sins.” In His Supper Christ is with us in a real, bodily way. In the feast of His body and blood He unites Himself to us for the forgiveness of our sins. He makes His home in us, strengthening the faith that was created through the preaching of the Gospel and washing of Holy Baptism. His presence leads us to love and serve God and our neighbor. In His Supper Christ gives us exactly what He says: His body and blood for the forgiveness of our sins. God grant that this meal would be preserved among through all time until we feast with all the saints at the marriage feast of the Lamb in His kingdom, which will have no end.

 

Born from Above

Text: John 3:1-17

This Sunday brings to a close what is called the “Festival” half of the Church Year. This means that in the first half of the Church year, we have all the sweet festivals like Christmas, Epiphany, Easter, Pentecost, and Holy Trinity. After today we don’t really have anything super special until we, as Lutherans, celebrate the Reformation in October. During the first half of the Church year we generally follow a chronological series of events in Christ’s life. But during the second half, the non-festival half, our Sundays are organized by theme.

Today is Trinity Sunday, a Sunday where the Church has historically set aside time to specifically treat the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. Traditionally, congregations recite the Athanasian Creed this one Sunday of the year. But of course, for us, every Sunday is a Trinity Sunday. We begin each service in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Our hymns and prayers address all three persons of the Trinity. Just last week, the sermon mentioned the Holy Spirit over thirty times. This thinking is what led German Christians to be stubborn when Pope John XXII declared this Sunday Trinity Sunday in 1332 and keep the original Gospel reading, instead of switching to Matthew 28.

The original Gospel reading for this Sunday, the first after Pentecost, is from John 3. This gives us an opportunity to speak about another area of Christian doctrine that remains a mystery to many people. In the Gospel reading Jesus teaches Nicodemus about the necessity of rebirth. Jesus says, Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.”1 But what is this being, “born again?” Why is it necessary, what is it, and how does it happen?

I.

You must be born again,” is really a slight mistranslation. I know that there is a footnote in my Bible that says the word, νωθεν, is ambiguous and could also mean “from above.” Given the context, we would wager that that is the correct translation; Jesus said, “Unless one is born from above he cannot see the kingdom of God.”2 But Nicodemus didn’t understand. He thought that Jesus meant that one must be physically born again. And so Nicodemus scoffed at the idea of an old man returning to his mother’s womb to be born a second time.

Though Jesus is not saying that one must be physically born out of their mother’s womb again, He is saying that rebirth is necessary. In fact He makes it a fourfold oath. He uses the word, “truly,” four times. Jesus said, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born from above he cannot see the kingdom of God.” Then clarifies what He means, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.”3

Jesus is dreadfully serious. Unless one is born from above, not only can he not enter the kingdom of heaven, but He can’t even see it. How true that is. Unless one is born again of water and the Spirit, they can neither enter nor see the kingdom of God. And so the world misunderstands the Gospel. Instead of looking to Christ for forgiveness and renewal, many claim from Christ affirmation for behavior they are already dead-set in. The necessity of rebirth is underscored by Jesus’ words, “That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.”4

All things that are born in the natural way are tainted by the corruption of sin. Even the inmost desires of our hearts and minds are devoid of righteousness. Like Nicodemus, our natural inclination is to come to Jesus in the dark, clinging to our own good works and morality as proof of our goodness. But minds set on works and our own worthiness are minds set on the flesh, which St. Paul, says are “hostile to God.” For minds set on the flesh cannot please God.5 Therefore Jesus knocks Nicodemus and us on our butts: “You must be born again.”

II.

But what does that mean, “You must be born from above?” Jesus explains in verses 14-15 of our text, “As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.”6 To be born again, from above, means to have faith. But lest we rest on our laurels and say, “I have faith, therefore I am reborn,” and stop there, we must say that to be reborn is to have a living and active faith. When you are physically born, you have a will, an understanding, and a desire to act. Thus it is also with the spiritual rebirth. We are given a new understanding, a new will, and new desires to act according to God’s Word.

Before rebirth, we were all by nature children of wrath. Our thoughts were evil, our actions were evil. Even our good works were a stench to God. But the rebirth and renewal of the Holy Spirit, being again, is having faith. By faith we are made children of grace. Jesus says this faith, this rebirth is necessary for salvation. He says, “Unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of heaven.” So far we’ve seen the necessity of rebirth, and that to be born again means to have faith in the Son of Man who was lifted up for our trespasses; But how are we born again?

III.

We are not born again by our own actions. It’s not your decision or prayer that makes you reborn, but it is solely the work of the Triune God. Thus Jesus says, “The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.”7 This also what James says when he writes, “Of [God’s] own will He brought us forth by the word of truth.”8

Article V of the Augsburg Confession, one of the documents that makes us Lutheran Christians, paints exactly where rebirth, where faith, comes from. It says, “So that we may obtain this faith, the ministry of teaching the Gospel and administering the Sacraments was instituted. Through the Word and Sacraments, as through instruments, the Holy Spirit is given. He works faith, when and where it pleases God, in those who hear the good news…This happens not through our own merits, but for Christ’s sake.”9

To be reborn, to be born from above, means to receive the gift of faith. Without a living faith, one can neither see the kingdom of God nor enter it. So that we may receive this faith, Christ instituted the preaching of the Gospel and the Sacraments. Through these things the Holy Spirit is given. The Holy Spirit works faith in us to believe in God the Father who created all things and still takes care of them. The Holy Spirit works faith in us through preaching and the Sacraments to believe that Jesus is the Son of God who suffered and died as payment for our sins. And, the Holy Spirit calls us through the Word to believe that He is the divine Comforter who is with us in all afflictions and assures us of the grace that we have in Christ.

Jesus said with utmost seriousness, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.” Unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. These are serious words, and like Nicodemus, we can be left in bewilderment by them. The biggest question that comes away from these words is, what if I don’t feel reborn? The answer: believe. Believe in Jesus Christ, who was lifted up on the cross as payment for your sins, and you will be saved. Pray that the Lord would continue to beat back the old sinful nature in you. Continue to hear God’s Word preached and receive Jesus’ precious Body and Blood for the forgiveness of your sins. By these things, Word and Sacrament, the Holy Spirit works in faith in you and causes you to be born from above, so that you already live in the Kingdom of God here in time and will always live there, in heaven.


1 The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2001), Jn 3:3.

2 Jn. 3:3.

3 Jn. 3:6.

4 Jn. 3:6.

5 Rom. 8:7-8.

6 Jn. 3:14–15.

7 Jn. 3:8.

8 James 1:18.

9 Paul Timothy McCain, ed., Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2005), 33.