The Wisdom of the Cross

Audio: Trinity V

Text: 1 Corinthians 1:18-25

We did not follow cleverly devised myths,” St. Peter writes, “when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of His majesty.” Peter said this to assure his audience, his beloved fellow Christians, about the message they received from him. There had been people coming to them charging that the Word of the Lord they received through St. Peter and the other Apostles was nothing but a myth: a sham, a tall-tale delivered by charlatans to deceive the simple-minded. No, St. Peter said, the things they heard, the things about Jesus – that He is God in the flesh, that He suffered, died, and rose from the dead for the forgiveness of sins, and that salvation is totally by His work alone – these things are not made up. And, by this message of the cross, they have been saved.

Perhaps you’ve heard the same argument. Maybe not personally, but definitely in some way, you’ve encountered opposition to your faith, and especially the BIble. There are all sorts of complaints out there: it’s poorly-written, hard to understand, culturally-bound to its period, unethical, unloving, full of lies and myths, a purely man-made document – and a shoddy one at that. And, there’s more out there. Some of these things are advocated by those who would call themselves Christians or have the responsibility of teaching in Christian colleges and seminaries. St. Paul explains today why God’s Word encounters such hostility from the world. He says, “The word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.”

The Word of God receives such hostility from the world because it runs against everything the devil and the Old Adam preach. The Bible says that all human beings are sinful – sinful not just in actions, but in word and thought as well. Moreover, humankind is so depraved by nature that there is not one single thing or thought that we can contribute to our salvation. Not one single thing. But, out of His great love for us, God sent His only-begotten Son to die on the cross for the sins of the whole world. He gives forgiveness of sins as a free gift through faith, apart from any and all works. Faith itself is also a work of God the Holy Spirit who, through the preaching of sinful men (pastors) and through the administration of the sacraments by those same men, creates a holy people for Himself and gathers them into the Holy Christian Church. All of this runs contrary to the wisdom of the world. The preaching of Christ’s cross is foolishness to the world, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

I.

The text begins, “For the word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, ‘I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.’ Have you ever wondered why there aren’t more Christians in the world? Have you ever had long, heart-felt conversations with someone about the Christian faith, where you were sure that the seed of God’s Word had been planted and was very likely to sprout, only to see the person totally reject that seed the very next day? Why is that many people become Christians after seemingly chance and random encounters, while many others, who had been raised Christians, fall away and become vehement enemies of Christ? These are the questions that St. Paul is answering in out text.

He sets the record straight for us on why there aren’t more Christians, why so many never come to faith, and why so many others fall away once they leave home. It’s because, St. Paul says, the word of the cross is folly to the world. The word that Paul uses is μωρία (moria), where the word “moron,” comes from. To the sinful nature, the BIble does not make sense. Jesus doesn’t make sense. Think about the Trinity for a second. The Bible says that there is one God, an omnipresent, all-power being. It stresses the oneness of the deity, and yet there are three persons. Or, how about that this divine being that transcends the physical world, became flesh and died? That is one major reason why Muslims and Christians do not worship the same God. They do not believe that God could possibly become flesh, or interact with creation in any intimate way, like how Christ unites Himself to us through the supper of His flesh and blood.

To us, these things do make sense. We might not understand the Trinity totally, but we believe it because it’s what the Bible says. We don’t understand how the Incarnation works beyond the words of the Creed, “He was incarnate by the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary,” but we believe it because we know it’s what the Bible says. In Genesis it prophesied that an Offspring of Adam and Eve would defeat the Devil. In Isaiah it says that a virgin will conceive and give birth to the Son of God. We don’t totally understand how the bread and wine become Christ’s body and blood in the Lord’s Supper, but we believe it because the Bible says so. Because the Holy Spirit has come to us through the preaching of the Word and in Baptism to create in us the gift of faith, we believe God’s Word and so are saved.

But to the world, this is all moronic and we are all morons. St. Paul lists two reasons why the world believes this. “Jews demand signs and Greeks seek wisdom.” These two groups are specific groups for Paul and the Corinthians. Throughout Jesus’ ministry the Jews demanded signs of Him, to demonstrate His power. They were seeking an earthly king who would throw off the Romans, and by mighty powers and wonders restore the glory of Israel. Some expect that still today. Others scoff at our faith and say that they would readily and happily believe in God if He would first put an immediate end to all evil. He will, of course, but not according to our timeline.

Others are like Greeks, who in Paul’s day were obsessed with wisdom. They would occupy themselves with long conversations about philosophy and rhetoric. They were opposed to Christianity not because of the miracles, for the Greeks were a religious people, but because of its perceived simplicity. As St. Paul said, “When I came to you, brothers, [I] did not come proclaiming to you the testimony of God with lofty speech or wisdom. For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and Him crucified.”

II.

Jews demand signs and Greeks seek wisdom, but we preach Christ crucified.” The sinful nature demands signs, wonders, and wisdom. But, we preach Christ crucified. That is, we preach that Jesus Christ, the Son of God from all eternity – equal to the Father and the Spirit in glory, power, and majesty – humbled Himself, by taking on frail human flesh. He fulfilled the Law of God by His perfect obedience, and He died as the payment for our transgressions. Heaven is real, but our attempts to get there ourselves will condemn us to hell. Instead, Christ bring us into His kingdom and gives us forgiveness totally by His own initiative and action, without any merit or worthiness within us.

All of that is folly to the world, but, St. Paul says, “It pleased God through the folly of what we preach to save those who believe.” Meaning – this is the God-approved method of salvation: Jesus died on the cross for our sins, then the Holy Spirit works through the preaching of Christ’s cross to create create faith and save people through it. That’s it. There are no works to contribute to our salvation, no good intentions, no lofty words of wisdom, just Jesus Christ and Him crucified. That is how God saves us. God says in our text that He will destroy the wisdom of the wise and the discernment of the discerning. How? By using the weak to shame the strong. It pleased God to grant us salvation through Jesus’ death on the cross. In the ancient world the cross was scandalous, a criminal’s death, not worthy to be spoken about in polite society. But, this shameful death, is how God saves – contrary to all the glorious ways we could think of.

St. Paul wrote, “The word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing.” Literally, the word of Christ’s cross is moronic to the world. But to us, it is the power of God for salvation. For it has pleased God to save the world and us through the preaching of that moronic word. Therefore, if the world considers the cross foolishness and those who believe in it to be morons, then let us be morons. Let us listen to the still, small voice of God in His Word. And, when Christ calls, let us cast our nets, for He provides a miraculous catch. Above all, let us pray to the Holy Spirit that He lead us to know nothing except Christ, and Him crucified. Romans 1:16, “I am not ashamed of the Gospel, for it is the power God for salvation to everyone who believes.”

Be Ye Merciful

Text: Luke 6:36-42

“Judge not, lest ye be judged yourself.” That seems to be a popular sentiment nowadays. True, it always has been, and always will be. Usually what’s meant by it is that, in our enlightened postmodern society, no one has any right to say anything about anything that anyone else is doing. Doubly so, if what you have to say is critical of someone else’s behavior. It doesn’t matter if your criticism is meant to help them or to, say, direct them towards the proper conduct of a Christian. It all breaks down to this: you can’t judge me. Is that what our text is about today? Perhaps.

Well, we’ll get it right out of the way – When Jesus says, “Judge not, and you will not be judged,” He’s not excluding any and all judging. Example. The author to the Hebrews says, “Take care, brothers, lest there be in any of you an evil, unbelieving heart, leading you to fall away from the living God. But exhort one another every day, as long as it is called ‘today,’ that none of you may be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.” We as Christians, as brothers and sisters, are to exhort each other in love towards good conduct and away from sinful behavior. St. James says it like this, “My brothers, if anyone among you wanders from the truth and someone brings him back, let him know that whoever brings back a sinner from his wandering will save his soul from death and will cover a multitude of sins.”

Jesus Himself also does not completely exclude judging from His ministry, for He regularly distinguished between His own teaching and the false teaching of the Pharisees and Sadducees. But, even then, Jesus says, “If anyone hears My words and does not keep them, I do not judge him…the word that I have spoken will judge him on the last day.” The Word, Jesus says, is what judges. It’s not that we as individuals pass our own judgments on others to condemn them, but we let God’s Word bear witness. That is also how were are to judge false teachers and the false doctrine they spew, by measuring it against God’s Word.

But, to bring us back, when Jesus says in our text, “judge not,” He’s illustrating His previous sentence, “Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful.” That is the key verse in our text, from which it all flows. Jesus is teaching us today about the Christian life. The Christian life is not one of judgment and hypocritical condemnation. Rather, the Christian life that we have been called into through Baptism is a life of mercy and forgiveness flowing from the love that we first received from God.

I.

Our text begins with Jesus’ words, “Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful.” We’re getting towards the end of St. Luke’s version of the Sermon on the Mount, called the “Sermon on the Plain.” The exhortation to be merciful really sums up the whole of Jesus’ teaching there. He taught the people to feed the hungry, to visit the sick, to comfort the mourning, to love your enemies and do good to those who hate you, for so God sends rain on both the just and unjust. So, the Christian life is one of mercy. And this mercy is rooted in the mercy that we have first received from God.

We already talked about one way to go off the rails on this passage, but it’s also easy to fall off on the other side, too. This certainly was the case in Luther’s time, where it was commonly taught that in order to receive forgiveness from God, you must first forgive others. But, we aren’t so different. We are often tempted to focus on the “be” rather than the “is.” Before we even have the opportunity to be merciful and show mercy to others, our Heavenly Father is merciful and has shown mercy to us. Our Father in heaven is full of grace and love. This is extolled throughout the Scriptures. In James it says, “Of His own will He brought us forth by the Word of Truth.” (1:18). St. Peter says, “According to His great mercy, He has caused us to be born again to a living hope.” St. Paul says, “He saved us, not because of works done by us in righteousness, but according to His own mercy.” Jesus says, “You did not choose Me, but I chose you.”

All of this is to say that God, in His mercy, overlooks the multitude of our transgressions, and He hurls our iniquity into the depths of the sea. Not because of us – not because of our works, our mercy, or our love – but because of His love for us in Christ Jesus. His love caused Him to send forth His only-begotten Son to suffer and die for us – we, who by our sinful nature despise Him. But, the sinful nature was crucified with Christ and clothed in His righteousness in Holy Baptism. In Baptism we die to sin and rise to new life with Christ. So now, when God looks at us, He sees not our sinfulness but the righteousness of His own Son that has been given to us. This is our reality. We no longer live, but Christ lives in us. What does that look like?

II.

Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful. Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven.” As we’ve already discussed, it’s not consistent with the whole Biblical witness to make this text say that God forgives because we forgive. Rather, even as God forgives us our many sins, so we too forgive others. It says in the Large Catechism, “He has promised that we shall be sure that everything is forgiven and pardoned, in the way that we also forgive our neighbor. Just as we daily sin much against God, and yet He forgives everything through grace, so we, too, must ever forgive our neighbor.”

Because our heavenly Father is merciful toward us, mercy is also the character of our attitude toward others. When Jesus says to judge not, He’s not excluding all judging, but the hypocritical judging that all sinners like to do by nature, which is why Jesus says right after it, “condemn not.” This is the type of judging that we do when we measure others against ourselves and declare that we are really not so bad, or at least not as bad as that person over there. That is precisely what it means to see the speck in your brother’s eye, but not notice the beam in your own.

It says in the Psalms, “Blessed is the one whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. Blessed is the man against whom the LORD counts no iniquity.” Beloved, if God does not count our sins against us, if He in fact covers it up, and we appreciate so much, thusly also we should do to others. Let’s be real: God does not blab our sins to everybody else. He knows we’re sinners and He forgives. So should we. In fact, the sin that we see in others, should first be an opportunity to confess our own sins. Then, and only then, having learned to repent and be forgiven of our own sins, are we able to show mercy to our neighbor by forgiving them also and encouraging each other toward good works.

III.

But, even as we are called to live in mercy as our Father is merciful, and even as we are Baptized Christians, we still find ourselves playing the hypocrite. The word literally means a pretender or an actor. And so, we often are: faking our love for us, feigning forgiveness, and pretending like we are less a sinner than those around us. For these things we should rightly be ashamed. Therefore, we confess our sins and He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. Hear, then, these words “He is merciful.” Our Father in heaven is love, mercy, and grace. He is also the perfect standard of justice and righteousness, and for that reason He demands punishment of sin. But, He has had mercy on us by sending His Son to take on flesh, suffer and die for our transgressions, and rise from the dead for our justification.

As forgiven saints of God, the Spirit of Christ is in our hearts to lead us in lives of love and mercy. The model of the Christian life is one of forgiveness and mercy. We forgive those who sin against us, we have mercy on those in need, we encourage one another toward good works, and we love – because He first loved us.

Christ, the Way of Love

Texts: 1 Sam. 16, 1 Cor. 13, Lk. 18

St. Paul wrote to the Corinthians in our Epistle reading about the enduring importance of love in the life of a Christian. You cannot have a right faith before God if the fruits of faith, love especially, are not displayed in your life. Paul uses himself as an example. If he were to speak in the tongues of men and angels, but have not love, he would be as useless as noisy gong or clanging cymbal. If he were to have the gift of prophecies and a faith that was strong enough to move mountains, without love, he would be nothing. If he gave everything he had, even his own life, without love, it would all be for nothing. To paraphrase the blessed saint, if you ain’t got love, you ain’t got nothin’.

The same is true for us. If we do not have love and if we show ourselves to be unloving people, then it seems that our faith is misplaced. For, a living and active faith in Christ necessitates, and actually produces, love for our neighbor. But let’s stop for a second here and talk about Christ and His love. Our fathers in the faith selected our texts today and placed them on the Sunday before Ash Wednesday, the Sunday before the 40-day journey to the cross, for a reason. In the Epistle, St. Paul extols love. It is patient and kind; it bears and endures all things. In the Gospel reading we heard Christ speaking of the things which He’ll endure for us: being mocked, spit upon, flogged, and being killed. The reason He undertakes all these things is the same as why He gives sight to blind Bartimaeus, and it’s the same reason why David, though the youngest of his brothers and last in line to be king, was chosen to shepherd God’s people: love. As we enter the season of Lent, we see in Christ the way of love. By choosing David over His older brothers, and by healing the blind beggar others rebuked, Jesus shows Himself to be the true way of love.

  1.  

We see this play out a few different ways in our readings this week. In our Old Testament text the boy who would become King David is anointed by the prophet Samuel. The current king, Saul, disobeyed the Lord’s Word and was rejected as king, though not immediately deposed. Samuel also anointed Saul to be king earlier, and one of the things that Scripture notes is that Saul was the son of a rich man. He was handsome, a head and shoulders taller than anyone around. Even though he was of the least of the tribes of Israel, he still looked the part of a king, and so he was. But, one of striking things that we see through the Lord’s Word is that He doesn’t always do things the way that would seem right. Particularly for Samuel and us, He doesn’t choose the strongest or the oldest for His inheritance. The Lord spoke to Samuel, “Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him. For the LORD sees not as man sees: man looks on the outward appearance, but the LORD looks on the heart.”

And so it was that the Lord anointed David, the youngest, to be king. This is just like how, out of Abraham’s sons, God chose the younger – Isaac. Of Isaac’s sons, it was Jacob who received the birthright and inheritance. Out of Jacob’s sons, Christ does not come from the line of Reuben, the firstborn, but from Judah. And now, here, is David – not the oldest, not the strongest, but the still the one from whom an offspring will come who will sit on the throne forever. This is how God works. He doesn’t choose us because of who we are or what we do, but because of who He is and what He’s done in Christ. In Christ, God has reconciled the world to Himself, including we, who like St. Paul, are untimely born. We all live two millennia after Christ walked the earth, and yet He dwells among us now in grace, truth, mercy, and love, in His Word and Sacraments. He daily and richly forgives our sins and binds up our broken hearts.

In His love for the lost and fallen, Christ reaches out to the untouchables, those scorned and rebuked by society and considered least in the eyes of the world. In our text from St. Luke’s Gospel Jesus is already on His final journey to Jerusalem and draws near to Jericho. This will be Jesus’ final miracle before His passion, and it is a work of love. Along the roadside sat a blind beggar, and when he heard that Jesus was passing by he began crying out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” What he could not see physically with his eyes, he saw with the eyes of faith. This Jesus is the Son of David promised so long ago, who would usher in the kingdom of God and the forgiveness of sins. The crowd rebuked the man and told him to be silent, but Jesus stops. He shows Himself the true Good Samaritan. In the parable, a man is attacked by robbers on his way to Jericho. Now, here in Jericho, Jesus stops to have mercy on a man in need. Jesus said to him, “Recover your sight; your faith has made you well.” Immediately the man recovered his sight and followed Jesus, glorifying God. All the people around also gave praise to the Father.

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In choosing David, the least of his brothers, and by healing the blind man who was worth so little in the eyes of the world, Christ shows us the way of God, the way of love. Christ Himself is the image of the invisible God, the embodiment of love. He is patient and kind. He does not shame us for our sin, but daily walks with us and forgives us when we fall. He does not envy or boast. He is not arrogant or rude, and He doesn’t resent us for all our transgressions against Him. Instead, He bears and endures all things for us, even the cross. This Sunday puts us at the brink of Lent. In just a few short days we will adorn ourselves in ashes, marking the Church’s season of focused repentance. Christ teaches us about all the things that His love for us will lead Him to endure. He says,

See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and everything that is written about the Son of Man by the prophets will be accomplished. For he will be delivered over to the Gentiles and will be mocked and shamefully treated and spit upon. And after flogging him, they will kill him, and on the third day he will rise.”

St. Paul wrote that if he were to have power to understand all mysteries and have all knowledge, and if he had faith to move mountains, and if he delivered up his body to death, but had not love, it would all be for nothing. My friends in Christ, Jesus is love. He is mercy, grace; forgiveness. These are what drove Him to the cross for you. It’s what lead Him to endure being handed over to the Gentiles, being mocked and treated shamefully. He bore being spit on and being flogged. Then, His love for you led Him to allow those nails to be driven into His flesh with hammers, and to hang there helpless, bearing in Himself the wrath of God against sin. He did this all so that, as He rose from the dead, so, too, will all those who believe in Him.

This love that Christ has for us, the mercy that He showed by choosing us for salvation from before the foundation of the world – and that not because of our works, but because of His grace – will never end. All things will pass away. In Paul’s language, prophecies, tongues, and knowledge will pass away, but love will not. In this life we don’t always see things clearly, for we know only in part and see as through a mirror dimly, but soon we will see the love of God in Christ Jesus face to face. And though our lives seem like one great Lent, a time full of trials and cycles of sinning and repenting over and over again, soon we shall know fully the eternal love that Jesus has for us. And while we are in this life, He looks past our sin and shame, past our weaknesses and temptations, and He brings us the forgiveness that He won for us on the cross. He chose David, the least of his brothers, and He healed blind Bartimaeus, to show to us His way: love. As He shows us His love, through His Word and Sacraments, He also strengthens us to show forth that love. May He ever continue the preaching of His Word and the administration of the Sacraments among us, both gifts of His love, as we enter His Lent and look to His Easter.

 

 

The Freedom(s) of a Christian

Text: 1 Corinthians 8:1-13

St. Paul writes in Romans 8, “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death.”[1] Under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, he also wrote in 1 Corinthians 9, “Though I am free from all, I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win more of them.”[2] In Romans it says that we have been set free in Christ from the laws of sin and death, but then in 1 Corinthians it says that we have been made servants of all. So which is it? Are we free or slaves? The answer is yes, both. In 1520 Martin Luther wrote a small booklet titled, “The Freedom of a Christian.” The heart the material is two sentences that seem to contradict each other, yet go together perfectly. First, “A Christian is a perfectly free lord of all, subject to none,” and second, “A Christian is a perfectly dutiful servant of all, subject to all.”[3]

We are at the same time, both free and slaves. In regards to salvation, we are completely and totally free. We are no longer bound by the chains of the Law, the chains which say, “Do this and live.” Instead, Jesus Christ fulfilled the Law perfectly in our place, and then died for our sins. No longer do we live in fear of being punished for our guilt, for Jesus Christ, the Holy One of God who has the authority to command demons to flee, has put away our sins as far as the east is from the west. He has freed us from the works of the Law for salvation so that we may live in love towards God and our neighbor. We have been released from our sin, and yet in love remain subject to neighbor in Christ.

I.

The past few weeks, the Epistle readings have been from 1 Corinthians, which is a rather difficult book. It’s difficult because the reason it was written was to settle the many issues that divided the Corinthian congregation. These issues included leadership, sexual immorality, whether to marry or not, lawsuits among believers, and many other things. Some of them, particularly the one today about food offered to idols, may seem out of date. But rather than let these teachings fall into distant history, God has preserved His Word throughout the millennia for our learning.

So this issue is, what is the big deal about eating food sacrificed to idols? Paul writes, “We know that ‘an idol has no real existence,’ and that ‘there is no God but one.’ For although there may be so-called gods in heaven or on earth—as indeed there are many ‘gods’ and many ‘lords’— yet for us there is one God, the Father, from whom are all things and for whom we exist, and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things and through whom we exist.”[4] We who have knowledge, who believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, know that idols are nothing. Statues of pagan gods, whether Greek, Roman, Hindu, you name it, are nothing. They are not alive, they are just objects made by human hands. We know this, so what’s the big deal?

Corinth was, much like the United States, a religiously plural society. Pick a “god,” and you could worship it there. Part of the worship of a few particular false gods in Corinth was eating. Mostly that was done in the inner parts of the temples, so only really committed people were involved with that. But, every so often, they would have public festivals were the community was invited into the courtyard and they passed out free meat to everyone, meat that had been sacrificed to whatever “god.” It turns out that these courtyards were also restaurants and gathering spaces, basically like a convention center. So, outside of the free food, the more well-to-do would conduct business there and eat the food, which had been sacrificed, like it was nothing. This could be bad.

The deal wasn’t that some had a stronger faith than others, for all who believe in Jesus are strong in Him, but that not all of them were able to separate the pagan from the true Faith. Think about it this way: Beer is a gift of God. It is a wonderful gift that many like to enjoy. But, what happens when a recovering alcoholic who is a new Christian, sees that his fellow Christians have a habit of getting schnockered every Sunday night? Now, you aren’t necessarily breaking God’s Commandments by having a number of beers, but you may be causing offense to your brother in Christ. Though you are free in Christ, Paul writes, “By your knowledge this weak person is destroyed, the brother for whom Christ died. Thus, sinning against your brothers and wounding their conscience when it is weak, you sin against Christ.”[5] This applies to any number of situations; you can probably pick them better than I.

II.

Jesus said in Matthew 20, “Whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be your slave, even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”[6] He Himself gives us the most perfect picture of Christian life. A Christian life is one of freedom, yes, but also one of service. Our freedom is not just that we can do anything we want, rather it is the true freedom, the peace that comes from sins forgiven. Apart from Christ, our sins hang around our necks like great boulders pulling us down into the ocean. No matter how hard we kick our legs and flap our arms to try and pull above water, it’ll never happen.

Instead of leaving us to drown in the damnation we created, Jesus came to save us. He came to pull us from the depths. And how? By becoming a servant. He came in perfect meekness, perfect humility, to subject Himself to the demands of the Law and in perfect service to His neighbor. This is most especially true in His death on the cross as payment for our sins. By His death and resurrection He has made us truly free and lords of all. That’s what Paul means in Romans 8, “We know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose.”[7]

You have been bought with a price. You have been purchased with the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ and are set free from sin. So now, as Scripture says, “You were called to freedom, brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another.”[8] These are the freedoms of a Christian: 1) In Christ we are free from the guilt of our sins, and, 2) In Christ we are free to serve our neighbor in love. What does that look like? What does love look like? It could be something as simple as saying hello to someone new on the way out of church. It could be inviting someone to come to church or a Bible study. It could be sharing with your friends that, even when your life goes to crap, you have a Savior that is with you there to life you up with His Holy Spirit. It could be loving and forgiving your husband or wife even when you really don’t want to, because Jesus died for their sins, too.

Will doing any of these good things get you to heaven? No, but by doing so you will have witnessed to the faith, love, and truth of Jesus Christ – and that is exactly why we’re here.


[1] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2001), Rom. 8:1–2.

[2] 1 Cor. 9:19.

[3] Martin Luther, Luther’s Works, Vol. 31: Career of the Reformer I, ed. Jaroslav Jan Pelikan, Hilton C. Oswald, and Helmut T. Lehmann, vol. 31 (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1999), 344.

[4] 1 Cor. 8:4–6.

[5] 1 Cor. 8:11–12.

[6] Mt. 20:26–28.

[7] Rom. 8:28.

[8] Gal. 5:13.