As We Were Created to Be

Text: Genesis 2:7-17

It’s hard to know where you’re going if you don’t know where you are or where you’ve been. When you’re traveling to a place you haven’t been before, you always keep track of where you started so that, if you end up off course, you know the part you’ve already traveled and can turn back. If you don’t know where you’ve been, it’s hard to know where you’re going. This much is shared with us, I believe, in our text today.

This week, we turn back to the beginning of the Bible, the beginning of the world, the beginning of the universe. We hear how God created man, in what state man and creation originally existed, and what we were created for. Unfortunately, because of sin, the reality of Genesis 2 is no longer what we experience. Instead, the experiences of our lives now are very different than how God intended them to be. The Holy Spirit shows us in this text how things were, so that we might know how they will be again. In other words, the Spirit shows us in Genesis 2 where we’ve been so that we know where – in Christ – we’re headed. In our text, we learn from God how He originally created us to be so that we would know a) the greatness of His creation; b) depth of our sin; and c) the greatness of His mercy.

I.

In Genesis 1 and 2, God gives us a factual and true account of how the world came to be. Before the universe existed, only God did. He forever and always existed in the unity of the Trinity. Out of His own desire to show love and mercy, God created the heavens and the earth. He spoke and all things came to be. Genesis 1 provides the overview of God’s creative activity. In chapter 2, the Spirit directs the focus on the particular activity of the sixth day of Creation: the day that God created man.

Moses wrote by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit,

When no bush of the field was yet in the land and no small plant of the field had yet sprung up—for the Lord God had not caused it to rain on the land, and there was no man to work the ground, and a mist was going up from the land and was watering the whole face of the ground—then the Lord God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature.[1]

After God created the earth, the land and seas, trees, all plants, and animals, His hand turned to create something in His own image and in His likeness – man. Everything else, God created by speaking; but man God formed from the dust of the earth. The Hebrew word is the word also used in Isaiah for a potter forming a vessel from clay. So, God molded man from the earth.

God formed man from the dust of the earth, breathed into him the breath of life, and man became a living creature. Unlike all other creatures, whom God caused to be by speaking, man alone was formed by God’s hand and endowed with an immortal soul. After God formed the man, the text says, “[He] planted a garden in Eden, in the east, and there he put the man whom he had formed.”[2] God created the garden for man, and man for the garden. Man’s job was simple. It says in verse 15, “The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to work it and keep it.” The only instructions God gave were these, “You may surely eat of every tree in the garden, but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”[3]

II.

Man’s job, as God created him was simple. Adam was to live in the Garden of Eden, to work it and keep it and care for it. Adam was to live in the garden and enjoy fellowship with God. His work would’ve been a joy, too. Genesis 2 is before the Fall. So, the unpleasant things we experience while working in the field – scorching heat, never-ending weeds – these would’ve been unknown to Adam. He would’ve needed no pesticide or fertilizer. His work would’ve been one-hundred percent joyful. He only had one command – don’t eat from the tree. This is the way Adam was to worship God, by listening to His Word. And, Adam could’ve done it. God created man with complete free will and the ability to not sin.

But, we know what happened, don’t we? Back on the First Sunday in Lent, the Old Testament text was Genesis 3. Adam was formed by God from the dust of the earth. He was molded like a clay vessel. Alone among all creatures, God blessed him with a soul and free will. Adam’s job, as Eve’s would be, was to live in the garden and work it. This work would’ve been a joy and be done in full communion with God. The way they were to worship was simply, listen to God’s Word. They had the free will and ability to do so. But instead, by the temptation of Satan, they chose to doubt and disobey God’s Word. They sinned. Ever since, the whole world has existed in this corrupted state.

God pronounced the consequences of sin in that text. To Eve, God said that childbearing would now be painful and the relationship between husbands and wives, stressful. To Adam, God said that the ground which used to be a joy to work would be cursed. Because of sin, the earth would now bear thorns and thistles, and food would only come by hard labor. Then, God gave the greatest consequence – which He said would happen – because of sin, man will return to the dust from whence he came. All these things we find true by our own experience. I’d ask you if farming is an easy job, but you know the answer. Sure, we take joy in our work from time to time. But, it’s rare to have a job without stress. And, God’s Word is true: the rest of our lives are filled with pain, suffering, and death.

III.

It’s hard to know where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve been. Now we know where we’ve been. God created man to be perfect. Man was placed in Eden to work and keep it. This would have been a joyful experience. The work would’ve come easily. Adam and Eve (and all after them) would neither have died nor experienced any illness or hardship. Then the Fall happened, and things have been going terribly. That is, until Christ – the Second Adam – came.

St. Paul wrote to the Romans that sin came into the world through the one man, Adam; and death came through sin. Therefore, all men die because all men sin. That’s how original sin works. We inherit from our fathers the inability to not sin. Because we sin, we die. But, St. Paul says, “The free gift is not like the trespass. For if many died through the one man’s trespass, much more have the grace of God and the free gift by the grace of that one man Jesus Christ…as one trespass led to condemnation for all men, so one act of righteousness leads to justification and life for all men.”[4] St. Paul means, the fall of Adam and Eve introduced the corruption of sin; but the righteous work of Christ – His obedience of the Law and His death on the cross for our sins – brings life back into the picture.

Christ earned for us re-entry into paradise and fellowship with God. After Adam and Eve sinned, God barred entrance to Eden by a flaming sword. But now, in Christ, our fractured relationship with God is restored. Through the forgiveness we’ve received in Christ, we now address God as our dear Father, and He speaks to us through His Word and Sacrament as to His beloved children. The work of Christ on the cross doesn’t just restore us to a right relationship with God, though; but, creation, too. Doesn’t St. Paul also say to Romans in chapter 8 that the whole creation groans as it awaits the redemption of our bodies?

By His death and resurrection, Christ has not only restored us to a right relationship with God, but He also restored creation. Scripture calls the “New Creation,” the place where the lion and lamb will lay together, where children will play with snakes, and death will not exist. These things will take place when Christ returns, and they’re what we mean when we say, “the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.” Now we know where we’ve been and where we’re going. God created man perfect, to work joyfully in the Garden and live in fellowship with Him. That was all destroyed by sin, and we experience that corruption in our lives. But, through Christ’s death and resurrection sin is forgiven. We are restored to fellowship with God. We now await Christ’s return, where He will raise the bodies of all believers and bring them with Himself into the joy of the new creation.


[1] Gen. 2:5-7, English Standard Version.

[2] Gen. 2:8.

[3] Gen. 2:16-17.

[4] Rom. 5:15-16.

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