The Augsburg Confession, Article I – God

In the Thursday morning men’s Bible study we’ve begun looking at the Lutheran Confessions. They are a collection of documents that mark us as specifically Lutheran Christians. Though they were written close to 500 years ago we continue to use them (and our pastors swear to uphold them) because they are a rightful exposition of the Holy Scriptures. We believe that like Scripture, the Lutheran Confessions can also speak to the common issues of our day as well. The first article of the Augsburg Confession is on God. Specifically, it was written to show that Lutherans are continuity with the historic Christian faith, we hold the same confession that Christianity has held for all time. We believe in one God, yet who exists in three divine persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. These three are of the same essence and power.

On this side of the grave we will never understand the doctrine of the Trinity fully. We must rest content on what is revealed to us in the Bible and know that we will understand more fully in time. Article I of the Augsburg Confession follows:


“1 Our churches teach with common consent that the decree of the Council of Nicaea about the unity of the divine essence and the three persons is true. 2 It is to be believed without any doubt. God is one divine essence who is eternal, without a body, without parts, of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness. He is the maker and preserver of all things, visible and invisible [Nehemiah 9:6]. 3 Yet there are three persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit [Matthew 28:19]. These three persons are of the same essence and power. 4 Our churches use the term person as the Fathers have used it. We use it to signify, not a part or quality in another, but that which subsists of itself.

5 Our churches condemn all heresies [Titus 3:10–11] that arose against this article, such as the Manichaeans, who assumed that there are two “principles,” one Good and the other Evil. They also condemn the Valentinians, Arians, Eunomians, Muslims, and all heresies such as these. 6 Our churches also condemn the Samosatenes, old and new, who contend that God is but one person. Through sophistry they impiously argue that the Word and the Holy Spirit are not distinct persons. They say that Word signifies a spoken word, and Spirit signifies motion created in things.”[1]

[1] Paul Timothy McCain, ed., Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2005), 31.

 

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